Four Ways To Prepare Your Garden For Winter

The world of organic gardening is very vast and exciting. There are so many ways that one can enter and use their knowledge of this field to help themselves grow healthier “green” plants. It depends completely on your skills and environment. That said, no matter what your organic gardening skills are, here are some tips to help you along.

If you want to have a more productive garden, expand your growing season into the fall by using row covers. Row covers keep heat in, frost out, and also protect against deer intrusion. The crops under the row covers should still be somewhat resistant to cold however, so it is best to choose greens and root vegetables.

If frost has killed your pumpkins before they’ve had a chance to turn orange, it’s not too late to save them. Cut the pumpkins off the vine, leaving a minimum of 4 inches of the vine on the top of the pumpkin. Wash them thoroughly with water mixed with a small amount of bleach to prevent the development of mold. Bring them inside, and place them in a warm, sunny location, turning them occasionally so the sun can reach all the green areas of the pumpkin. Within a few weeks or less, you’ll have bright orange pumpkins to carve into jack-o-lanterns or use to make homemade pumpkin pie.

Most people design their gardens with plants in their hands and a shovel. However, the best idea is to wait to choose your plants after you have decided upon a layout or landscaping design. Once you have completed the landscaping, move on to the last step to your garden; planting your favorite flowers, shrubs and trees.

If your tomato plants have long branches that are not flowering or producing fruit, go ahead and pinch them off. It won’t hurt the plant, but will actually help. Pruning back the branches that are not producing fruit, allows the plant to focus its energy and nutrients on producing larger and more flavorful fruit.

If you are not a fan of wearing gloves when gardening but still hate dirty fingernails, try scraping your fingernails in a bar of soap prior to beginning. The soap will keep soil from entering underneath your nails, plus the soap will help keep your nails from cracking or breaking.

When choosing plants for your garden, pick plants that are native to your geographic region. Plants native to your region will naturally do well in your garden because they are already adjusted to your climate. When you plant native plants, you will not be surprised by any unexpected results when your plants mature.

Treat your flowering bulbs correctly after they finish blooming and they will return again next year. Allow the foliage to remain for at least eight weeks after flowering to ensure that your bulbs are able to photosynthesize enough food for the following season. Removing the leaves earlier could result in weak flowers or no flowers at all the next year.

The water that is leftover from the steamed vegetables is great to pour over them. You can also acidify soil for rhododendrons, gardenias and more by using coffee or tea grounds. Herbal chamomile tea is an effective, affordable treatment for fighting fungi.

If little ones live in your home, consider including everbearing strawberries in the garden plot. Children love to pick their own fruit right out of the garden, and will be more willing to help with the process if they get something out of it.

Choose silvers and grays to lighten up the garden on dull days and shine in the moonlight. While most gray-leafed plants are attractive enough to hold their own in the garden, they are often used due to the effect they have on surrounding colors. They make pastel colors look brighter, and tone down the effect of vivid colors. Most plants with silver or gray foliage are native to the Mediterranean, therefore requiring little watering in the dry months. The best known silver and gray plants are dusty miller, lychnis, silver lace and artemisia.

When first growing a garden, attempt to put as much effort into the first bed as possible. Land that hasn’t been used for a while needs an overhaul to begin changing into a viable spot for plants. Usually these regions either lack the right nutrients or consistency of soil. If you plan to make a garden out of patch, make sure that it has all the right pre-conditions to planting.

To naturally rid your soil of nematodes, which are soil-dwelling pests that can hurt tomatoes and potatoes, use marigolds. The chemicals released by the marigolds’ roots and decaying leaves is toxic to nematodes. Plant marigolds near your tomatoes or potatoes, or till them into the soil before planting.

When you start your organic garden, start a garden journal at the same time. Make note of when you planted seeds, how successful they were, any pests that you noticed, and what tricks proved to be effective. This information will be very helpful when you plant your garden in the following years.

Try cultivating organic gardening. Plant single garlic cloves during the spring or fall seasons in soil that is moist and well drained. Plant the cloves one to two inches beneath the soil about four inches apart and with the pointed end up. Green garlic shoots, which can be cut while growing, can substitute nicely for scallions or chives. The bulbs of the garlic are ready for harvesting when the very tops of them begin to brown. The bulbs should be left outside in the sunshine for a few days to dry and harden the skin. You can then store the bulbs loosely or gathered into bunches in a cool location.

Organic gardening is a fascinating and exciting world that is only limited by your knowledge and environment. There are endless products and techniques you can sue for your organic garden. Start experimenting to find something new to use on your organic garden or even improve upon a technique. Use these tips to grow!

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